Posts Tagged ‘Killinick’

COVERING MANURE HEAP TO KEEP RAIN OFF – 1ST wk in December 2014

Thanks to Willie Kelly from Killinick up the road for delivering 4 loads of beautiful horse manure from Dara Ward’s stables in the Sanctuary, Killinick. After a couple of weeks, the grass growth atop the manure heap was spectacular.

The grass growth prompted me to cover the heap fully with builders’ plastic sheeting quickly. Nicky Kyle and Kathy Marsh, two organic growing friends from Fingal, have reminded me from time to time to cover manure and manured ground, to avoid the rain leaching away the goodness.

In this virtual peninsula in the very South East of Ireland we get strong winds coming from the Caribbean  and heading for Wales, so tying down plastic sheeting is crucial. Old carpet and rope serve

Weighing down the plastic sheeting with old carpet before fixing ropes to secure the whole covered manure heap.

Weighing down the plastic sheeting with old carpet which has then been tied in place with ropes to rainproof the whole covered manure heap.

useful purposes to weigh down the plastic and prevent ropes from cutting in to the plastic itself.

So far so good. The compost is staying fairly dry and friable and is easy to dig out.

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ANOTHER DELIVERY OF HORSE MANURE TO MULCH VEG BEDS – 1st wk in January 2014

A welcome sight, the arrival of another load of horse manure, thanks to Dara Ward and the Kellys of Killinick.

A welcome sight, the arrival of another load of horse manure, thanks to Dara Ward and the Kellys of Killinick.

We  are lucky to have found a friendly stable owner who knows a friendly haulier of manure since we moved here to Tacumshin, near Rosslare, in Co. Wexford. The other morning, not long after dawn, Willie Kelly arrived from Killinick by tractor with a large trailer load of horse manure in tow. The last load Willie delivered is not fully used yet but it has become inaccessible by wheelbarrow. The heavy rain in the last month has created a temporary pond between the manure heap and the vegetable bed. It will do no harm for the manure to be left to rot down until such time as the ground dries up anyway.

The latest load of horse manure is located much nearer the new veg patches so no excuse. The veg beds are marked out. As soon as the soil is a bit drier, we’ll be out to turn the sod, mulch with manure and cover the fresh beds with black re-useable plastic sheeting. Meanwhile there is pruning and coppicing to be carried out while the apple, pear  and other trees are bare.

THANKS TO THE KELLY BROTHERS FOR HAULING LOAD OF HORSE MANURE – 2nd wk in Oct. 2013

Developing a three acre organic horticulture holding is hard work, so any divine dig out is gratefully received. Recently while showing the parents around the churchyard of St Enoch’s in nearby Killinick, a divinely inspired horse neighed nearby to indicate a neighbouring stable. This led to meeting Dara Ward, the keeper of the horses and custodian of  a well rotted mountain of horse manure. Dara was happy to be rid of his mountain of ‘brown gold’ as long as we hauled it away.

Next stop, Richard, William and Walter Kelly, the resident hauliers and machinery experts in KIllinick. William then loaded up a tipper trailer and tractor. Lucky enough the gate was wide enough for the tractor. Tractors are big beasts now compared to the Massey Ferguson 135 I used to drive about on!

Right now the manure is being barrowed to the newly dug veg beds to rot down over the winter. More of that anon.

William tipping well rotted horse manure, ready for barrowing to cover newly dug (and some no-dig) veg patches.

William tipping well rotted horse manure, ready for barrowing to cover newly dug (and some no-dig) veg patches.

TRUSTY GREENHOUSE TRAVELS TO TACUMSHIN TO FEED US OVER FIRST WINTER – 4th Wk in September 2013

Where do you start with three overgrown acres in Tacumshin, near Carnsore Point, Co Wexford. All around us is the home of early potatoes and rare migrant birds? A birdwatcher’s paradise.  As mentioned last week, moving from Balbriggan was not easy. Carrying a greenhouse to which I have become sentimentally attached, did not make it any easier! However it was a 50th birthday present from my Fingal Green friends and I would miss the greenhouse, as I will miss them too. However, my friends may be more inclined to visit IF ‘their’ greenhouse is here in Wexford to greet them!

Thanks to Eoin Hurley, the disassembly and assembly of the glass and metal structure was very efficiently carried out. Eoin bought cement at Maguire’s Builders’ Provider Store in Rosslare Harbour to secure

The Balbriggan greenhouse Tacumshin, Co Wexford. Step 1 in making a meadow into a kitchen garden.

The Balbriggan greenhouse Tacumshin, Co Wexford. Step 1 in making a meadow into a kitchen garden.

the greenhouse legs in place. The greenhouse is now ready to grow our winter greens and nurture early sowings of peas in pots etc for planting out next spring. Cuttings of hedging like box and herbs like curry plant are also cossetted under glass, until they root. The greenhouse is like a little Fingal embassy in the heart of County Wexford, and like me, it has been made very welcome!

Next week, the lay out of the outside vegetable beds will start to take shape. At present, we are waiting for a delivery of horse manure from stables nearby in Killinick. After that let the barrowing of numerous loads begin!